job search tips

Top 5 Job Search Tips for College Seniors

Top 5 Job Search Tips for College Seniors
Top 5 Job Search Tips for College Seniors

Thanksgiving is almost here, so is the end of your last fall semester. Have you started your job search? Here are five key job search tips to help you land your first job after college!

1. RESEARCH: Finding a job is hard work. The job market is competitive and the search for job opportunities is time-consuming. Even after you discover a good opportunity, the movement from identification of the opening to actually getting the job requires many steps. Therefore it’s best to tackle the job search in the same way you would a final exam or paper. Allocate as much time to your job search as you would to an academic endeavor, commit yourself to achieving the greatest success you can in exploring and identifying opportunities, ace the interview, and receive an offer - that's the A+ in “job search” you are aiming for!
 
2. PREPARE: Experienced professionals unanimously agree that the most important factor in a job candidate's success is good preparation. What bothers professionals most when they meet with a student or job seeker is when it is clear the candidate hasn’t done any advance preparation. So make sure to carefully study your own résumé, explore the company website, keep up to date with relevant current events, and above all make sure to show your interviewer that you’ve done your homework!  
 
3. PRACTICE: There’s an old joke that goes, "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” And the answer is, "practice, practice, practice!” The same applies to the question, "How can I improve my interviewing skills?" The best way to hone your interview skills is to practice, practice, and practice some more. Almost everyone needs to practice to be an effective and successful interviewee. Most people are not naturally gifted public speakers. It's only through endless practice that people become good or even great speakers. The same applies to interviewing. How can you practice? Sign up for mock interview sessions offered by your college or ask a friend to interview you. Create hypothetical questions that might be asked at an interview and answer them out loud. Practicing out loud is key. Practice your opening lines to common interview questions such as "tell us about yourself" or "walk me through your résumé." With practice you’ll become a poised, relaxed, and confident interviewee ready to nail the interview!

4. UPDATE & REVISE: You finished another semester and one or more of the following occurred: your GPA went up; you took a course relevant to the career you hope to pursue; you wrote a great research paper; you did volunteer work; you were elected to a position as an officer of a club. Did you update your résumé to reflect these changes? Maybe you moved, have a new email address, or a new phone number. Time to revise that résumé! You forgot that you had received an honor last year or found a better phrase to describe the responsibilities you had at your last summer job. Revise the old information now! Updating and revising your résumé is something you should be doing regularly to accurately reflect vital information, as well as to further improve and refine your résumé. We can help you with your résumé check our résumé builder and résumé resources to build better résumés.
 
5. NETWORK: Students often tell us that they “don't have a network." What is a network? A college student's network can be pretty extensive, including family, neighbors, and friends, as well as teachers, classmates, college administrators and alumni. And that's just for starters! What is the purpose of a network? Your network is your support system and information resource. “Networking” is simply utilizing, activating, and growing that support and information system. Whether you ask someone to listen to you as you practice your pitch, get another set of eyes to review your résumé, or learn about a friend’s company or why a person does what they do, each person in your network can help you in this case with your job search. It’s great to have a network to ask for help, but remember that helping you is only one part of how a network works. It is not just about what my network can do for me, it's about helping, listening and being supportive of those in your network too. A network is a two way street. Networks require nurturing and take time to develop and build.

We’ll review more tips in the New Year! 

Posted By: 
Carol

Secret to Interview Success: Mock Interviews

Important Interview Tip for Students
Important Interview Tip for Students

What’s the secret sauce to interview success? Mock interviews. 

Mock interviews are one of the best and simplest ways to sharpen your interview skills. They should be a must for everyone preparing for a job interview. Here’s why.

You are set for your interview. You’ve updated your resume, done your company and industry research, finished preparing answers to likely questions, and also prepared questions to ask your interviewer. What more can you do to be truly ready for your internship or job interview? Answer: scheduling and completing at least one mock interview. 
 
The purpose of a mock interview is simple. Telling your story to another person takes practice. Very few people can make a presentation or a speech without a dry run. Practicing out loud to ensure smooth delivery is a must for all of us. Actors and musicians have dress rehearsals for performances, so why shouldn’t you have a dress rehearsal for your interview? The mock interview will provide you with the opportunity to hear yourself give the narrative. You’ll have the opportunity to adjust and fine-tune your presentation from checking your voice articulation, tone, modulation (a voice sound check) to checking on your physical presentation (body language), while also reviewing your content. 
 
Mock interviews are especially useful if you have an opportunity to practice with someone who has more interview experience than you. The interviewer doesn’t have to be a seasoned pro; anyone who has had some interview experience can help you identify gaps in your narrative or where to add greater emphasis to help you shine more. If you are able to tap an alumni or a friend working in the area you are seeking employment, you’ll find their insights invaluable.
 
The mock interview pulls together and tightens up the material that you have been preparing for your interviews. Encouraging words of support give you an extra confidence boost. After practicing your new and improved interview technique, you will feel an increased level of confidence and poise for the real deal. 

If you really want to go the extra very worthwhile mile, record your mock interview. It’s truly an eye opener. You’ll learn more about your interview skills and gaps viewing one recording than you can ever imagine. For many of us, the recorded mock interview was a game changer.

We are certain of the benefits gained from mock interviews. It’s the secret sauce to a more successful interview.  
 
For more tips on interviews check Zoomdojo's Interview Tips.

Posted By: 
Carol

Make Your Passion Your Career: Arts Jobs

Make Your Passion Your Career: Arts Jobs
Make Your Passion Your Career: Arts Jobs

How does a student majoring in an arts related field find a career? 
 
Arts education often consciously does not teach students how to integrate their artistic pursuits with business and technology know-how - skills which, in lieu of royal patronage of eras past, have become essential for a successful career in the 21st century. So as an artist or art historian or musician, how can you can earn a living after college? How can you get beyond Oscar Wilde’s observation: “When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money.” 

 

Fortunately, job opportunities in the arts are more numerous than commonly believed. From computer aided drafting and design to science illustration and art therapy, creative people are in demand. If you can convert your artistic skills into the digital domain, you will vastly increase your employability, especially in fields like advertising, video game design, film, and publishing. Art and engineering are also intricately connected. Besides traditional industrial and product design, creative people are also needed for the emerging field of “eco-design,” which focuses on sustainable materials. Advertising and film require sound engineers and musicians, who should be familiar with the most commonly used digital audio workstations. Composers make great coders because composition is math, and a type of coding. Marketing and advertising require talented writers too - good well written content is still king.
 
Of course an artist, musician, or writer can simply excel at being a pure artist, musician, or writer, but this path is fraught with peril and financial uncertainties and instability. Beyond exceptional ability, an artist must make her/his “brand” as compelling and desirable as possible, which involves extensive networking, social media, and self-promotion, and a bit of luck. Working in the creative industry, in finance, marketing, and administrative roles, are alternative ways to remain connected to the arts while ensuring financial security.
 
So don’t restrict yourself to imagining that the only path forward is becoming the next Mozart or Michelangelo. Don’t be left wondering what to do with that art history degree. Your education has made you qualified for a wide range of jobs, within industries and in roles that touch upon your passion. Consider broader options: explore private sector companies as well as educational institutions and non-profits. Look at creative industries, technology companies, communications and marketing companies, design firms and more. These pathways will build your skills, create opportunities and dovetail your talent and your interest in the arts to your career. There are many careers available to those who are willing to be open-minded about their range of options.

 
Visit Zoomdojo to learn about our events that focus on how young graduates can connect the arts with the wider economy in a way that is both meaningful and pays the bills. We also publish listings for arts-related internships and jobs, which you can access via Zoomdojo job search.

Posted By: 
Camden

Why Cover Letters Matter

Why Cover Letters Matter
Why Cover Letters Matter

Resume updated? Check!  And, cover letter? Not that important ... so, no problem. WRONG!
You’ve updated your resume, and are now in the throes of applying to internships and jobs. Did you put any thought into your cover letters? You think to yourself, no one reads them… well, you could be right, but you could also be completely wrong. 
 
You may be wondering what the purpose and role of the cover letter is. Beyond the resume, the cover letter gives you an opportunity to tell the prospective employer what you can do for the company. You can use it highlight aspects of the resume or add additional information that did not fit into the resume. Simply stated, the cover letter is a way to communicate why you are right for the job. 
 
But remember not to waste this prime real estate. The average time a recruiter spends reading (or scanning through) a cover letter is 3-5 seconds, giving you less time to make an impression than you will take to read this article. You should be precise and gain the reader’s attention from the very first line, which should explain clearly what the cover letter is about (E.g. Subject: The Human Resources First Year Apprenticeship). You should not repeat facts which already exist in your resume. Rather, you should provide strong (and interesting) supporting evidence of why you can do the job better than anyone else. 
 
Unless explicitly instructed not to include a cover letter, it is appropriate to write one as part of your job application; and for many employers, it is an expected part of the job seeker's package. While there's no certainty that your letter will be read, it is a valid communication and marketing tool. And from your point of view, your letter may catch someone's attention and help you move up in the pool of applicants under review. You really have nothing to lose - and everything to gain - by writing a strong cover letter for each job that you apply for.

So don’t disregard cover letters. Take the time to compose a meaningful cover letter and increase your odds to achieve job search success! 
 
You can check Zoomdojo Cover Letters for more cover letter tips and advice. 

Posted By: 
Ritu

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Friday, March 24, 2017
Why Cover Letters Matter

Resume updated? Check!  And, cover letter? Not that important ... so, no problem. WRONG!
You’ve updated your resume, and are now in the throes of applying to internships and jobs. Did you put any thought into your cover letters? You think to yourself, no one reads them… well, you could be right, but you could also be completely wrong. 
 
You may be wondering what the purpose and role of the cover letter is. Beyond the resume, the cover letter gives you an opportunity to...

Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Make Your Passion Your Career: Arts Jobs

How does a student majoring in an arts related field find a career? 
 
Arts education often consciously does not teach students how to integrate their artistic pursuits with business and technology know-how - skills which, in lieu of royal patronage of eras past, have become essential for a successful career in the 21st century. So as an artist or art historian or musician, how can you can earn a living after college? How can you get beyond Oscar Wilde’s observation: “When...

Tuesday, January 31, 2017
Important Interview Tip for Students

What’s the secret sauce to interview success? Mock interviews. 

Mock interviews are one of the best and simplest ways to sharpen your interview skills. They should be a must for everyone preparing for a job interview. Here’s why.

You are set for your interview. You’ve updated your resume, done your company and industry research, finished preparing answers to likely questions, and also prepared questions to ask your interviewer. What more can you do to be truly ready for your...

Pages